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The Selected Poems of Emily Dickinson

by Emily Dickinson
Billy Collins

eBook

0 of 1 copy available

Emily Dickinson lived as a recluse in Amherst, Massachusetts, dedicating herself to writing a "letter to the world"--the 1,775 poems left unpublished at her death in 1886. Today, Dickinson stands in the front rank of American poets. This enthralling collection includes more than four hundred poems that were published between Dickinson's death and 1900. They express her concepts of life and death, of love and nature, and of what Henry James called "the landscape of the soul." And as Billy Collins suggests in his Introduction, "In the age of the workshop, the reading, the poetry conference and festival, Dickinson reminds us of the deeply private nature of literary art."


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Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Kindle Book

  • Release date: August 22, 2012

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9780307823786
  • Release date: August 22, 2012

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9780307823786
  • File size: 1874 KB
  • Release date: August 22, 2012

0 of 1 copy available

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook

subjects

Fiction Poetry

Languages

English

Emily Dickinson lived as a recluse in Amherst, Massachusetts, dedicating herself to writing a "letter to the world"--the 1,775 poems left unpublished at her death in 1886. Today, Dickinson stands in the front rank of American poets. This enthralling collection includes more than four hundred poems that were published between Dickinson's death and 1900. They express her concepts of life and death, of love and nature, and of what Henry James called "the landscape of the soul." And as Billy Collins suggests in his Introduction, "In the age of the workshop, the reading, the poetry conference and festival, Dickinson reminds us of the deeply private nature of literary art."


Expand title description text