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TR: The Story of Theodore Roosevelt

Part 2 of 2
Video

Theodore Roosevelt entered his second term in office anxious that he had only four years to achieve greatness. Torn between conservatives and progressives in Congress, Roosevelt had little success with his legislative agenda. However, he accomplished what he could by stretching the power of the presidency, most notably on issues of conservation. During his presidency, Roosevelt placed over 230 million acres of land under public protection. By the end of his term, Roosevelt reluctantly kept his promise not to run for reelection and supported his friend Taft as his successor. Out of politics, he went to Africa on safari. He returned disappointed with Taft's abandonment of his reforms and chose to challenge him for the Republican nomination in 1912. He lost the nomination, but ran as the candidate of the newly formed Progressive (or "Bull Moose") Party.

Note: This is part 2 of a series of 2 parts.


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Publisher: PBS

Streaming video

  • ISBN: 1415716855
  • Release date: November 8, 2007
  • Duration: 01:48:16
  • Number of parts: 1

  • Public Performance: Not permitted

  • Formats

    Streaming video

    Languages

    English

    Theodore Roosevelt entered his second term in office anxious that he had only four years to achieve greatness. Torn between conservatives and progressives in Congress, Roosevelt had little success with his legislative agenda. However, he accomplished what he could by stretching the power of the presidency, most notably on issues of conservation. During his presidency, Roosevelt placed over 230 million acres of land under public protection. By the end of his term, Roosevelt reluctantly kept his promise not to run for reelection and supported his friend Taft as his successor. Out of politics, he went to Africa on safari. He returned disappointed with Taft's abandonment of his reforms and chose to challenge him for the Republican nomination in 1912. He lost the nomination, but ran as the candidate of the newly formed Progressive (or "Bull Moose") Party.

    Note: This is part 2 of a series of 2 parts.


    Expand title description text